Why?

Hi patient friends and family,

Kazz and I have been having a (we feel) well deserved break. Wonderful though it was to be so easily available to all our supporters and interested visitors it has been a great relief not to be living in a fish bowl 24 hours a day.

And now we begin the eagerly anticipated ‘phase 2′, which is to attempt to hold to account the police, autolift, the council, DVLA and court service, as well as to have a word with the prison ombudsman about discrimination towards prisoner’s religious practices.

We hope, in the next few days, to rescue our caravan and the remainder of our camp from Ellesmere Port Yard to somewhere not too far from Chester. We’ll let you know once we are settled there.

In the interum, Kazz and I have got proper married: on our one year anniversary (3rd October) we went out and got matching Tomboy-Pink tattoos. One day, perhaps on the winter solstice, we will have a party to which all our friends and family will be able to come and celebrate with us. Of course, our wedding was not official – what kind of idiot would involve the church and state in a love affair? – but it was undeniably real.

Meanwhile we’d like to remind you what our actions are all about.

Mohandas Gandhi said, “Civil disobedience becomes a sacred duty when the state is lawless and corrupt.” and we would like you to know some of the reasons it has become obvious to us that the state is certainly lawless and corrupt:

Tony Farrell was a Senior Intelligence Analyst for South Yorkshire Police. He was given an assignment to assess the current security threats to the UK and, having discovered that both the 9/11 and 7/7 terrorist incidents were orchestrated by state actors rather than muslim terrorists, he wrote the truth in his report and was sacked for it.

Here is what Tony has to say about the lawlessness and corruption of the state:

So, for all those who asked, “Will the blog continue now the camp has been evicted?” the answer is “certainly”; we’ve only just begun.

love, peace, harmony and grace,
Prajna and Kazz